Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Page 1 sur 2 1, 2  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par soraya le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 14:16

J'ouvre un topic je sais pas si c'est bon

Chaleur !!!

Went dans un le magazine chinois Prestige, c'est the classe!!!

L'article avec d'autre photos vivement la HQ




Spoiler:
A PRESTIGE HONG KONG EXCLUSIVE
THE CEREBRAL SEX SYMBOL

WENTWORTH MILLER IS AN INTELLECTUAL IN AN INDUSTRY THAT USUALLY REWARDS BEAUTY OVER BRAINS. OF COURSE IT DOESN'T HURT THAT HE'S ALSO A HANDSOME DEVIL. JOE YOGERST INTERVIEWS THE ACTOR WHO PLAYS THE EINSTEIN-ESQUE MICHAEL SCOFIELD ON THE HIT TV SERIES PRISON BREAK

The times are a-changing, sang Bob Dylan, and so is the definition of ethnic and cultural identity. Barack Obama was born in Hawaii to parents from Kenya and Kansas and was partly raised in Indonesia. Tiger Woods is half Thai and half southern California black – and his wife is a blue-eyed, blonde Swedish model. But maybe the most extreme example of the 21st-century everyman is actor Wentworth Miller, star of the hit television series Prison Break and someone who personifies the term "melting pot" when it comes to genealogy.

It would have been enough to claim that he was born in England, was largely raised in Brooklyn and continues to linger a finger in both the Anglo and American pies with dual citizenship. But Miller's heritage is far more complex than that. His mother descends from Russian, Arab, French and Dutch immigrants to America; his father mixes Jamaican, German, British and African-American genes. If that doesn't define "citizen of the world," what does?

Miller is also a horse of a far different colour when it comes to Hollywood – a bone fide intellectual in a town (and industry) where success is normally determined by good looks rather than the combination of gears whirling inside your skull. He attended one of America's top 100 high schools, Midwood in Brooklyn, and then went on to distinguish himself at Princeton, where he studied English literature and drew political cartoons for the student newspaper.

It was at Midwood that he got his first taste of the stage lights as a member of SING!, a highly competitive musical theatre programme started by New York City schools in the late 1940s. Barbra Streisand, Neil Diamond and Paul Simon are among those who cut their teenage acting teeth in the programme, so Miller was in good company. From SING! it was a natural progression to joining the Princeton Tigertones, an all-male a cappella group. "Stinky" (that was Miller's nickname) sang baritone in their live performances and on a Tigertones album called Cheers released in 1994.

A year later he was in Los Angeles, trying to break into showbiz. His first gig was working part-time in the development department of a production company that made TV movies. But within a couple of years he was snagging on-screen parts. His first TV acting job was playing a humanoid sea monster on Buffy the Vampire Slayer in 1998. After playing bit parts in several unheralded (and largely unwatched) shows, Miller finally hit the big time with a starring role in the 2002 television miniseries Dinotopia, a dazzling mix of live action and special effects that earned five Emmys.

Miller didn't get a chance to really test his acting chops until 2003, when he auditioned for the film version of the best-selling Philip Roth novel The Human Stain. The central figure in the story is erudite college professor Coleman Silk, a light-skinned African-American who has spent his whole life passing himself off as white rather than face racial prejudice. Given his own ethnic make-up, it was a role that fit Miller to a tee. And it came across in the audition. "When I was done, [the casting director] was in tears and I was in tears," he told The New Yorker magazine. There was no small irony in the fact that the movie's producers made him prove his own ethnicity by showing them family photos.

The film got mixed reviews – The Times of London dubbed it "sapping and unbelievable melodrama." But Miller generally drew praise for his portrayal of the young Coleman, while Anthony Hopkins played the older Silk. In some respects, he trumped the Oscar-winning Welshman. The review in Variety raved that "Miller, who gives a strong, muted performance, convinces as a light-skinned African-American in a way Hopkins never does."

In intellectual terms, there wasn't much of a leap from Coleman Silk to Michael Scofield, the brilliant young structural engineer who Miller plays in Prison Break, a fact that no doubt helped him land a starring role in the groundbreaking television drama. The basic premise of the show is simple yet daring: younger brother gets himself thrown into prison to help older brother accused of a crime he didn't commit. But much like Miller's own background, both Scofield and the ongoing plots are much more complicated than they may seem at first glance.

For instance, Scofield is afflicted with a neurological condition called "low latent inhibition," which prevents him from blocking out and selectively processing the countless stimuli that engulf people every day. Combined with a high IQ, this gives Scofield a superhuman ability to diagnose and evaluate his surroundings – a handy skill to have when you're trying to break out of prison and battle the shadowy political-corporate conspiracy that put your brother on death row.

Miller's multilayered take on Scofield earned him a 2005 Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series and is cited as one of the main reasons why a show that seemed destined to last only one season is into its fourth year on US network television. Despite its critical acclaim, Prison Break has always been a modest success in America. Not so overseas, where the series has proved a breakout hit in countries as far flung as Australia, France, Poland and Serbia. The show's first season in Hong Kong broke the local record for viewership of a foreign drama previously held by The X-Files.

Despite his increasing popularity, the 36-year-old actor has somehow avoided becoming regular fodder for the tabloid press. Whenever he's asked about his love life, Miller almost always throws out a stock answer that he's too busy for that sort of thing – which hasn't prevented outfits like Who magazine from tabbing him as one of the sexiest men on the planet, along with the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Jude Law and Johnny Depp.

Are you surprised by the success of Prison Break outside the US?
We've got an incredibly loyal fan base here in the States but the show is by no means a smash hit. So it was a real surprise to discover there were millions of people out there beyond our borders who totally dug our hard work. It's really gratifying to think that in Africa, Asia, Europe and everywhere in between, there are fans making room for us in their lives. I now know that pretty much anywhere I go I'm going to run into people who know my face like they know their friends and family. And that's pretty extraordinary.


prestige


transmis à la :traduc:


Dernière édition par soraya le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 14:22, édité 1 fois
avatar
soraya
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 32
Localisation : Cergy (95)
Date d'inscription : 25/02/2007

http://wentworthearlmiller.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par soraya le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 14:17

sorry pour le double poste mais y 'avait plus de place

Spoiler:
What gives the show such international appeal?
I think the show's themes are universal. It's got action, adventure, romance, etc. But at its heart, it's about family. It's about how far one man is willing to go to save a loved one. And that's something that anyone anywhere can relate to.

How did you snag the role of Michael Scofield? Just a regular audition?
Actually, to be honest, they were scraping the bottom of the barrel by the time I came along. Every young actor in Hollywood had read for that part, but they still hadn't found their guy. I was the very, very last person to audition for Michael Scofield and after that, it all happened pretty quickly. I read the script on a Friday, auditioned for it the next Monday, had my call-back on Tuesday, found out I had the part Tuesday night and we were in Chicago shooting the pilot the following week. It all happened really quickly, which I think worked to my advantage. There was no time to get nervous.

How are you and Michael alike – and not alike?
Michael and I are both neat, and we both have a real respect for organisation and discipline. But Michael takes those qualities to the extreme. He's heroic, but there's also something dark and shadowy just beneath the surface. I have a lot of respect for him, but he has many flaws, and that's what makes him such an interesting character to play. If it came down to it, there are definitely people I'd give my life for, but there's no way I'd be clever enough or crazy enough to pull off what Michael has. He's half hero, half madman. That's definitely where we part company.

You have described Michael as the person who does the "narrative heavy lifting" for the show. What do you mean by that?

I mean it's Michael's job to explain things to the audience. Like, "This is what's happening, this is what just happened and this is what's about to happen." It's a plot-heavy show and we have to work hard to keep the audience up to speed. And nine times out of 10, that job falls to my character.

Are you happy with the direction Prison Break is taking in Season Four, which just started in the US? The fact that there's much less emphasis on incarceration and escape in favour of a proactive attack against the Company?
I'm relatively happy with the show's new direction. The brothers can't be on the run forever and we certainly can't send them back to prison. I feel like it's time for Michael and Lincoln to stand and fight and take down the bad guys once and for all. And in an ideal world, the Fox network will give us that opportunity. I really think that after all we've put the characters and the audience through, we've earned the right to a final showdown, a really satisfying conclusion. Hopefully that's where this season is heading. Hopefully the powers that be will allow us all to exeunt when the time is right.

Do you and other actors ever get involved in trying to develop the story lines and arcs? Does any of your own input ever make it into the scripts?
At this point, I think it's safe to say that the scripts are like blueprints and it's the actors' job to colour between the lines as we see fit. I don't get to decide what happens to Michael Scofield, but at this point in the series, nobody knows him like I do. Four seasons in, safeguarding the integrity of the character, line by line and beat by beat, is my responsibility. And the writers, to their credit, allow us to make whatever changes and tweaks we feel are necessary. It's become a real collaboration.

Let's talk about your past. Given your diverse background, do you feel American or British or something else entirely?
I am and have always felt like an American, but the UK has a special place in my heart. I also have dual citizenship, which makes me feel connected to the UK in a very real and tangible way, even though I was only born there. Having a British passport also makes it much easier to work overseas, and as the international marketplace becomes more and more important in the entertainment industry, that can be a very useful thing to have.

Did your parents encourage your career or was this something driven by your own goals and desires?
They were supportive but cautious. Unless you're actually in the business, sometimes it's hard to understand what it is that we do, how an actor's life works. All my parents knew was that for years I didn't have a steady job or a steady source of income. But they're thrilled with my success. They enjoy seeing my face on TV every week. I just have to warn my mom beforehand if something terrible's going to happen to my character. She doesn't like watching Michael get hurt.

So you end up at Princeton, study literature and graduate. What happens after that? How did you make the transition from Ivy League to Hollywood?
By the time I graduated from college, I'd basically given up my childhood dreams of becoming an actor. It just seemed too risky, too unrealistic. But I still wanted to be part of the business in some way, so I got a job working behind the scenes for a company in Los Angeles that made movies for television. But it wasn't long before I had to admit to myself that I really wanted to act. I had to answer that "what if?" question. So I started taking acting classes and going out on auditions. And to pay the rent, I worked as a temp at the studios and the networks, which gave me invaluable insight into the other side of the business. It really made me appreciate how much work goes into putting together a movie or a TV series. It's made me grateful on a deeper level for everything I've achieved.

What was it like working with Anthony Hopkins in The Human Stain?
Unfortunately, I didn't actually get to work with Anthony Hopkins because I was playing his character as a younger man, so we didn't have any scenes together. We shot all of my stuff first, and then Tony was given the footage to watch. So it was almost like he had home movies of his character's youth. And then when they put the whole movie together, I noticed that he'd copied one or two of my mannerisms and put them into his performance, which was thrilling to watch, and incredibly flattering.

Will you venture into feature films again?
Time will tell. Right now I'm very busy with the fourth season of the show, but I am starting to think about the future. There are definitely lots of directors I'd like to work with, like Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino and Ang Lee, among others. I'd probably say "yes" to any role they offered, no matter how small. In many ways, once Prison Break comes to an end, I feel like I'll have to start from scratch, really reinvent myself for audiences. Re-educate them as to who I am and what I can do. I think it'll be a lot of work, but really necessary if I'm going to leave Michael Scofield behind.

You famously appeared in two Mariah Carey music videos around the time that Prison Break first hit the airwaves. How did you get that gig?
Brett Ratner directed the show's pilot, and after we were done he recommended me to Mariah for her videos. I'd never done a video before and there was no guarantee that the show was going to go anywhere, so I said yes. We shot both videos back to back, and Mariah was a total professional. She really went out of her way to make me feel at home. And then her record was a hit and those videos got a huge amount of airtime, so when the show started up, a lot of people knew me as that guy from the Mariah Carey videos. And I really think it helped launch the show.

Do you have any musical ambitions of your own? After all, you were in the Princeton Tigertones.
My singing days are behind me, sadly. After a decade of neglect I can barely carry a tune. But I wouldn't mind doing a movie musical or something -– just as long as there's enough money in the budget to fix my songs in editing.

What do you like to do when you're not working?

Most of my free time is spent relaxing, watching DVDs, reading or napping. But I don't spend all my time on the couch. When we were working in Dallas [shooting Prison Break], I did a lot of road-tripping, just little daytrips to small cow towns all over Texas. And I had such a great time. I think that's one of the best perks of the actor's life – time to travel and time to explore the way other people live their lives.

Any favourite vacation spots?
My favourite place in all the world is Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York. It's right up the street from where I grew up. It's the best spot of green on the planet and I try to sneak back there whenever I can. Sitting on a park bench eating a Jamaican beef patty and watching the people go by . . . it doesn't get any better than that. But for sheer drama that's part nature, part man-made, I think Petra in Jordan is one of the most stunning places on Earth. Those incredible ancient facades carved right into the red rock. Unbelievable. Breathtaking.

Have you ever been to Asia? What were your impressions and memories of the places you visited?
I've been to Thailand and South Korea, and what I remember most is the amazing food I had in both countries. And I've been hearing that American Chinese food is nothing like the food you actually find in China, so I'm eager to experience that difference for myself. I also remember how polite and friendly the people were. I was very impressed because I'm a big fan of etiquette and manners. It's so important to treat other people with the same degree of respect that you'd like to be treated yourself. That's why I always try to be on my best behaviour when travelling abroad, especially to Asia. There's nothing worse than coming across like the stereotypical "ugly American."

Paraphrasing that old saying "You are what you eat," there's a new one – "You are what you drive." What do you drive and how does it reflect your personality?

I think that's a potentially dangerous statement. It's the reason so many people are driving around in big, fancy cars they can't really afford, living larger than their means and getting themselves into trouble. My father always said a car was supposed to get you from point A to point B, and that's basically my theory, too. It's why I don't drive something outrageously expensive. That said, I do drive a hybrid because I think it's important to be environmentally conscious. So I guess that's a statement in and of itself.

Given your college major, I have to ask what books you've read lately?

Unfortunately I spend most of my free time reading scripts. But I do have this little stack of books waiting for me to pick them up. I've got The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon, The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson and Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay, which I picked up because I liked the TV show Dexter so much. Hopefully I'll get around to them one of these days. It's just a question of when.

You seem to fly pretty well below the paparazzi radar and I'm sure you want things to stay that way. But that leaves fans gasping to know about your social life. You've been quoted as saying you really don't have much of one because you're always working. But come on – give us the real scoop.

Ha, ha . . . No.

source prestige

transmis à la :traduc:
avatar
soraya
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 32
Localisation : Cergy (95)
Date d'inscription : 25/02/2007

http://wentworthearlmiller.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par FallingStar le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 14:45

Merci+++ pour ces nouvelles infos et photos, So' ! calin
Quel régal en ce Dimanche pluvieux...
Et comme tu dis, vivement la version HQ !

FallingStar
Despérément WEM-III

Féminin
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par bibouille le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 14:49

**merci mille fois et plus soraya**

evanoui evanoui evanoui evanoui evanoui

avatar
bibouille
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 48
Localisation : bourgogne
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par nidith le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 15:15

omg Oh oui, merci!

Mais il le sait qu'il nous rend dingue, ou bien???!!! dinguotte2
avatar
nidith
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 41
Localisation : BdR - France
Date d'inscription : 07/01/2008

http://needyou.kazeo.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par mel07 le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 17:25




Et bien mazette, quelle classe. Je suis toute evanoui evanoui J'adore son petit sourire heart
avatar
mel07
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 35
Date d'inscription : 28/09/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par vanessa le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 17:28

mel07 a écrit:


Et bien mazette, quelle classe. Je suis toute evanoui evanoui J'adore son petit sourire heart

moi aussi j'ai remarqué ce sourire, il en dit long vous ne trouvez pas???
avatar
vanessa
WEM-III tatoué(e)

Féminin
Age : 28
Date d'inscription : 05/09/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par sasso30 le Dim 9 Nov 2008 - 22:39

J'ai mouru encore et toujours.

Cette photo Bibouille, maaaaa elle est perfect !!!
avatar
sasso30
WEM-III tatoué(e)

Féminin
Age : 28
Localisation : Ne le cherchez plus, Il est à moi ! =D
Date d'inscription : 02/11/2007

http://www.soso-in-sfo.skyblog.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par line le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 1:12

je me joins à vous dans le club des mouru!!
merci beaucoup pour ces nouvelles infos super

line
WEM-III débutant(e)

Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par angel_steph le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 2:05

Merciii :)!! Wow J'ai pas de mots pour d'écrire ce que je vois tellement que j'en suis bouche bée !! :merci
avatar
angel_steph
WEM-III fossilisé(e)

Féminin
Age : 24
Localisation : Avec Went..
Date d'inscription : 30/03/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par pretty le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 2:22

shocked shocked shocked

Merci ma Soso, tjrs à l'affût des dernières tofs content

kiss

_________________

[On peut partir sans ne jamais rien quitter
On peut rester sans ne jamais rien oublier
]
avatar
pretty
L'ivresse WEM-III

Féminin
Age : 42
Localisation : Dans les bras de.....
Date d'inscription : 12/01/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par zaragoza le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 2:35

OH my god!!!! Ces yeux-là.......... I love you Pffffff
avatar
zaragoza
WEM-III Newbie

Féminin
Age : 31
Localisation : In my dreams
Date d'inscription : 24/11/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par lilin le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 12:36

tu m'étonnes, CHALEUR hot
avatar
lilin
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 41
Localisation : bretagne ou sur les traces de Went
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2006

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par namoussa le Lun 10 Nov 2008 - 15:24



moi celle lààààààààààààààààà

vin diou il as vraiment trop la classe shocked
avatar
namoussa
WEM-III emprisonné(e)

Féminin
Age : 38
Localisation : sous la couette avec...
Date d'inscription : 07/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par turtle88 le Mer 12 Nov 2008 - 11:30

evanoui

Nan mais quelle classe incroyable....

Ces photos sont magnifiques, et ce coup ci les fringues sont top ! super

Merci ma So pour tout ça !! bravo kiss

_________________
avatar
turtle88
En totale vénération de WEM-III

Féminin
Age : 41
Localisation : Définitivement à l\'Ouest...
Date d'inscription : 17/02/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par FallingStar le Dim 16 Nov 2008 - 10:52

Traduction par Zaragoza
de l'article précédemment posté par Soraya

Spoiler:
A PRESTIGE HONG KONG EXCLUSIVE
THE CEREBRAL SEX SYMBOL

WENTWORTH MILLER IS AN INTELLECTUAL IN AN INDUSTRY THAT USUALLY REWARDS BEAUTY OVER BRAINS. OF COURSE IT DOESN'T HURT THAT HE'S ALSO A HANDSOME DEVIL. JOE YOGERST INTERVIEWS THE ACTOR WHO PLAYS THE EINSTEIN-ESQUE MICHAEL SCOFIELD ON THE HIT TV SERIES PRISON BREAK

The times are a-changing, sang Bob Dylan, and so is the definition of ethnic and cultural identity. Barack Obama was born in Hawaii to parents from Kenya and Kansas and was partly raised in Indonesia. Tiger Woods is half Thai and half southern California black – and his wife is a blue-eyed, blonde Swedish model. But maybe the most extreme example of the 21st-century everyman is actor Wentworth Miller, star of the hit television series Prison Break and someone who personifies the term "melting pot" when it comes to genealogy.

It would have been enough to claim that he was born in England, was largely raised in Brooklyn and continues to linger a finger in both the Anglo and American pies with dual citizenship. But Miller's heritage is far more complex than that. His mother descends from Russian, Arab, French and Dutch immigrants to America; his father mixes Jamaican, German, British and African-American genes. If that doesn't define "citizen of the world," what does?

Miller is also a horse of a far different colour when it comes to Hollywood – a bone fide intellectual in a town (and industry) where success is normally determined by good looks rather than the combination of gears whirling inside your skull. He attended one of America's top 100 high schools, Midwood in Brooklyn, and then went on to distinguish himself at Princeton, where he studied English literature and drew political cartoons for the student newspaper.

It was at Midwood that he got his first taste of the stage lights as a member of SING!, a highly competitive musical theatre programme started by New York City schools in the late 1940s. Barbra Streisand, Neil Diamond and Paul Simon are among those who cut their teenage acting teeth in the programme, so Miller was in good company. From SING! it was a natural progression to joining the Princeton Tigertones, an all-male a cappella group. "Stinky" (that was Miller's nickname) sang baritone in their live performances and on a Tigertones album called Cheers released in 1994.

A year later he was in Los Angeles, trying to break into showbiz. His first gig was working part-time in the development department of a production company that made TV movies. But within a couple of years he was snagging on-screen parts. His first TV acting job was playing a humanoid sea monster on Buffy the Vampire Slayer in 1998. After playing bit parts in several unheralded (and largely unwatched) shows, Miller finally hit the big time with a starring role in the 2002 television miniseries Dinotopia, a dazzling mix of live action and special effects that earned five Emmys.

Miller didn't get a chance to really test his acting chops until 2003, when he auditioned for the film version of the best-selling Philip Roth novel The Human Stain. The central figure in the story is erudite college professor Coleman Silk, a light-skinned African-American who has spent his whole life passing himself off as white rather than face racial prejudice. Given his own ethnic make-up, it was a role that fit Miller to a tee. And it came across in the audition. "When I was done, [the casting director] was in tears and I was in tears," he told The New Yorker magazine. There was no small irony in the fact that the movie's producers made him prove his own ethnicity by showing them family photos.

The film got mixed reviews – The Times of London dubbed it "sapping and unbelievable melodrama." But Miller generally drew praise for his portrayal of the young Coleman, while Anthony Hopkins played the older Silk. In some respects, he trumped the Oscar-winning Welshman. The review in Variety raved that "Miller, who gives a strong, muted performance, convinces as a light-skinned African-American in a way Hopkins never does."

In intellectual terms, there wasn't much of a leap from Coleman Silk to Michael Scofield, the brilliant young structural engineer who Miller plays in Prison Break, a fact that no doubt helped him land a starring role in the groundbreaking television drama. The basic premise of the show is simple yet daring: younger brother gets himself thrown into prison to help older brother accused of a crime he didn't commit. But much like Miller's own background, both Scofield and the ongoing plots are much more complicated than they may seem at first glance.

For instance, Scofield is afflicted with a neurological condition called "low latent inhibition," which prevents him from blocking out and selectively processing the countless stimuli that engulf people every day. Combined with a high IQ, this gives Scofield a superhuman ability to diagnose and evaluate his surroundings – a handy skill to have when you're trying to break out of prison and battle the shadowy political-corporate conspiracy that put your brother on death row.

Miller's multilayered take on Scofield earned him a 2005 Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series and is cited as one of the main reasons why a show that seemed destined to last only one season is into its fourth year on US network television. Despite its critical acclaim, Prison Break has always been a modest success in America. Not so overseas, where the series has proved a breakout hit in countries as far flung as Australia, France, Poland and Serbia. The show's first season in Hong Kong broke the local record for viewership of a foreign drama previously held by The X-Files.

Despite his increasing popularity, the 36-year-old actor has somehow avoided becoming regular fodder for the tabloid press. Whenever he's asked about his love life, Miller almost always throws out a stock answer that he's too busy for that sort of thing – which hasn't prevented outfits like Who magazine from tabbing him as one of the sexiest men on the planet, along with the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Jude Law and Johnny Depp.

Are you surprised by the success of Prison Break outside the US?
We've got an incredibly loyal fan base here in the States but the show is by no means a smash hit. So it was a real surprise to discover there were millions of people out there beyond our borders who totally dug our hard work. It's really gratifying to think that in Africa, Asia, Europe and everywhere in between, there are fans making room for us in their lives. I now know that pretty much anywhere I go I'm going to run into people who know my face like they know their friends and family. And that's pretty extraordinary.

"UNE EXCLUSIVITE DE « PRESTIGE HONG KONG »

LE SEX SYMBOL INTELLO

WENTWORTH MILLER EST UN INTELLECTUEL DANS UN SECTEUR QUI PREFERE SOUVENT RECOMPENSER LA BEAUTE PLUTOT QUE L’ESPRIT. EVIDEMMENT, LE FAIT QU’IL SOIT AUSSI UN BEAU GOSSE NE GACHE RIEN. JOE YOGERST S’ENTRETIENT AVEC L’ACTEUR QUI JOUE L’EINSTEIN-ESQUE MICHAEL SCOFIELD DANS PRISON BREAK, LA SERIE QUI CARTONNE.

Les temps changent, chantait Bob Dylan. Ce pourrait être la définition d’une identité culturelle et ethnique. Barack Obama est né à Hawai et a été en partie élevé en Indonésie par un père du Kenya et une mère du Kansas. Tiger Woods est à moitié thaïlandais et à moitié noir du sud de la Californie (sa femme est un mannequin suédois, blond aux yeux bleus). L’exemple le plus représentatif de l’homme du 21ème siècle est l’acteur Wentworth Miller, star de la série à succès Prison Break, il incarne le terme « melting pot » à merveille.

Il aurait été suffisant de dire qu’il est né en Angleterre, a été en grande partie élevé à Brooklyn et a toujours eu un pied sur les deux continents grâce à sa double nationalité. L’histoire de Wentworth Miller est cependant bien plus complexe. Sa mère descend de hollandais, français, arabes et russes immigrés aux Etats-Unis, son père est le fruit d’un métissage de gènes jamaicains, allemands, britanniques et africains-américains. Si ceci n’est pas la définition de « citoyen du monde », quelle est-elle ?

Lorsqu’il débarque à Hollywood, Miller a déjà plusieurs cordes à son arc : c’est un vrai intellectuel, dans une ville (et un secteur) où le succès est habituellement déterminé par la beauté plutôt que par l'association de neurones s'agitant dans un crâne. Il a fréquenté une des 100 meilleures universités américaines, Midwood à Brooklyn, puis s’est distingué à Princeton, où il a étudié la littérature anglaise et réalisé des BD engagées pour le journal étudiant.

C’est à Midwood qu’il prend le virus de la scène en tant que membre de SING!, le programme d’une école de musique très réputée, lancé par les écoles de New-York à la fin des années 40. Barbara Streisand, Neil Diamond et Paul Simon, entre autres, y ont fait leurs classes. Wentworth était donc en bonne compagnie. Après SING!, il rejoint logiquement les Tigertones de Princeton, un groupe masculin de chant à capella. « Stinky » (c’était le surnom de Wentworth) était baryton durant les concerts et sur l'album des Tigertones, "Cheers", sorti en 1994.

L’année suivante, il part à Los Angeles pour tenter de se faire une place dans le monde du showbiz. Il obtient son premier job à mi-temps dans le département développement d'une société de production de téléfilms. Deux ans plus tard, il est déjà passé de l'autre côté de la caméra. Son premier rôle à la télé est un monstre des mers humanoïde dans Buffy contre les vampires en 1998. Après différentes apparitions dans plusieurs programmes ici et là (et à peine regardés), Wentworth décroche enfin le gros lot avec un premier rôle dans la mini-série Dinotopia en 2002, un mélange éclatant d'action et d'effets spéciaux qui a récolté cinq Emmy awards.

Jusqu’en 2003, Wentworth n’a pas vraiment eu l’occasion de tester ses talents d’acteurs. Il passe alors une audition pour l'adaptation au cinéma du best-seller de Philip Roth, « La tache ». Le personnage central de l’histoire est l’érudit professeur d’université Coleman Silk, un africain-américain à la peau claire, qui a préféré se faire passer pour un blanc toute sa vie plutôt que de devoir affronter des préjudices raciaux. Etant donné son propre bagage ethnique, c’est un rôle qui allait comme un gant à Michael. En effet, ça s'est vu à l'audition. "Quand j'ai eu terminé, (le directeur de casting) était en larmes et moi aussi", a-t-il confié au magazine The New Yorker. Il n'y a eu aucun arrière pensé de la part des producteurs lorsqu’ils lui ont demandé de prouver ses origines en leur montrant des photos de famille.

Le film a été accueilli de façon mitigée par la presse : "un mélodrame invraisemblable et décevant” selon le Times de Londres. Mais Wentworth est la plupart du temps cité pour son interprétation du jeune Coleman, Anthony Hopkins jouant Silk, adulte. A bien des égards, il a volé la vedette à l'oscarisé Welshman. Variety parle avec enthousiasme de Wentworth “qui offre une interprétation solide, toute en retenue et qui est largement plus convaincant en africain-américain à la peau clair que Anthony Hopkins. »

En somme, il n'y avait qu'un pas entre Coleman Silk et Michael Scofield, le jeune et brillant ingénieur des ponts et chaussées que Wentworth incarne dans Prison Break. Sa contribution à « La tache » l'a sans aucun doute aidé à décrocher un des rôles principaux de la série dramatique. Le script de départ est simple mais audacieux : Petit frère atterrit en prison pour aider Grand frère accusé d’un crime qu’il n’a pas commis. Mais à l’image des origines de Wentworth, Scofield et les intrigues de la série se révèlent être beaucoup plus complexes qu’elles n’y paraissent au premier abord.

Scofield est, par exemple, atteint d’une maladie neurologique appelée “déficit d’inhibition latente”, qui l’empêche de refouler et de faire un tri sélectif des innombrables stimulis que l’on reçoit chaque jour. Associé à un QI au dessus de la moyenne, cela donne à Scofield une incroyable capacité à analyser et évaluer ce qui l’entoure. Un talent très utile, soi dit en passant, lorsque vous essayez de vous échapper d'une prison ou que vous combattez le sombre complot politique et commercial qui a envoyé votre frère dans le couloir de la mort.

Le job du surdoué Scofield a valu à Wentworth une nomination aux Golden Globes en 2005, dans la catégorie Meilleur acteur dans une série dramatique. Selon certains, c'est l'une des raisons principales qui font que la série, qui semblait destinée à s'arrêter à la fin de la première saison, entame sa quatrième année à la télévision américaine. Bien qu’encensé par la critique, Prison Break a toujours été un succès modeste aux Etats-Unis. A l’étranger, en revanche, la série se porte très bien comme en Australie, en France, en Pologne ou en Serbie. A Hong-Kong, la première saison a même battu le record local de télespectateurs pour une série étrangère détenu jusque là par X-Files.

Malgré sa popularité croissante, l’acteur de 36 ans a réussi à éviter le piège des tabloids. Lorsqu’on lui pose des questions sur sa vie amoureuse, Wentworth utilise presque toujours la même réponse, prétendant qu’il n’a pas de temps pour ce genre de chose. Ce qui n'a pas empêché certains magazines tels que le "Who magazine" de le placer parmi les hommes les plus sexys de la planète, au côté de Leonardo Di Caprio, Jude Law et Johnny Depp.


Êtes-vous surpris par le succès de Prison Break hors à l’étranger ?
Nous avons un groupe de fans fidèles incroyables ici, aux Etats-Unis, mais la série n'a pourtant pas un immense succès. Ce fut donc une réelle surprise de découvrir qu’il y a des millions de gens au-delà de nos frontières qui sont fans de notre travail. C'est vraiment gratifiant de penser qu’en Afrique, en Europe et partout ailleurs, des fans nous font une place dans leurs vies. Je sais maintenant que, presque partout où je vais, je vais rencontrer des gens qui me reconnaitront comme si j’étais une personne de leur famille ou un ami. C'est fantastique."

:merci

FallingStar
Despérément WEM-III

Féminin
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par bibouille le Dim 16 Nov 2008 - 15:08

encore merci à vous Soraya et Saragoza!
(quel boulot!...)

jvous bise très fort! copine super
avatar
bibouille
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 48
Localisation : bourgogne
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par mel07 le Dim 16 Nov 2008 - 16:57

Merci du travail Saragoza! :bisous
avatar
mel07
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 35
Date d'inscription : 28/09/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par lilite le Dim 16 Nov 2008 - 17:09

merci beaucoup les filles super
avatar
lilite
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 52
Localisation : région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par vanessa le Lun 17 Nov 2008 - 20:21

merci beaucoup pour la trad !!!!!
avatar
vanessa
WEM-III tatoué(e)

Féminin
Age : 28
Date d'inscription : 05/09/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par FallingStar le Mar 25 Nov 2008 - 19:35

Traduction par Ladiuvernuà
de la 2nde partie de l'IT précédemment transmise par Soraya

Spoiler:
Extrait :
What gives the show such international appeal?
I think the show's themes are universal. It's got action, adventure, romance, etc. But at its heart, it's about family. It's about how far one man is willing to go to save a loved one. And that's something that anyone anywhere can relate to.

...

You seem to fly pretty well below the paparazzi radar and I'm sure you want things to stay that way. But that leaves fans gasping to know about your social life. You've been quoted as saying you really don't have much of one because you're always working. But come on – give us the real scoop.
Ha, ha . . . No

source prestige

Qu’est ce qui donne à la série un tel attrait au niveau international ?
Je crois que les thèmes de la série sont universels. Il y a de l’action, de l’aventure, de l’amour, etc. Mais au cœur de l’histoire, il y a famille. Cela parle de jusqu’où un homme est prêt à aller pour sauver un être cher. Et ça c’est une chose à laquelle tout le monde peut s’identifier.

Comment avez-vous arraché le rôle de Michael Scofield ? Juste une simple audition ?
En fait, pour être honnête, ils en étaient à racler le fond du tonneau quand je suis arrivé. Chaque jeune acteur à Hollywood avait fait une lecture pour ce rôle, mais ils n’avaient pas encore trouvé leur bonhomme. J’ai été la toute, toute dernière personne à passer l’audition pour le rôle de Michael Scofield et après ça, tout s’est passé plutôt vite. J’ai lu le script un vendredi, passé l’audition le lundi suivant, et on m’a rappelé le mardi, appris que j’avais le rôle le mardi soir et nous étions à Chicago pour tourner le Pilote la semaine suivante. Tout s’est passé vraiment vite, ce qui je pense à été à mon avantage. Je n’ai pas eu le temps de m’inquiéter.

Combien ressemblez-vous à Michael – et combien ne lui ressemblez-vous pas?
Michael et moi sommes tous les deux ordonnés, et nous avons tous les deux le respect de l’organisation et de la discipline. Mais Michael porte ces qualités à l’extrême. Il est héroïque, mais il y a quelque chose de sombre et de trouble juste sous la surface. J’ai beaucoup de respect pour lui, mais il a beaucoup de défauts, et c’est ce qui le rend un personnage si intéressant à jouer. S’il le fallait, il y a absolument des personnes pour lesquelles je donnerais ma vie, mais en aucun cas je ne serais aussi intelligent ou aussi fou pour réussir ce qu’il a fait. Il est moitié héro, moitié fou. C’est là que nos chemins se séparent.

Vous avez décrit Michael comme la personne qui fait le “gros besogne de narration” de la série. Que voulez-vous dire par là ?
Je veux dire que c’est Michael qui doit expliquer les choses au public. Par exemple, « ceci est ce qui est en train de se passer, ceci est ce qui vient de se passer, et ceci va se passer. » C’est une série avec une intrigue compliquée, et il faut travailler dur pour garder le public au courant. Et neuf fois sur dix, ce boulot retombe sur mon personnage.

Etes-vous content d la direction que prend Prison Break dans la saison quatre, qui vient juste de commencer aux Etats-Unis ? le fait qu’il y ait beaucoup moins l’accent sur l’emprisonnement et la cavale en faveur d’une action contre la Compagnie ?
Je suis plutôt content de la nouvelle direction de la série. Les frères ne peuvent pas être en cavale pour toujours et on ne peut décidément pas les renvoyer en prison. Je crois que le moment est arrivé pour Michael et Lincoln de se battre et de faire tomber les méchants une fois pour toutes. Et, dans un monde idéal, la chaîne nous donnera cette opportunité. Je crois vraiment qu’après tout ce qu’on a fait subir aux personnages et au public, on a gagné le droit d’avoir une confrontation finale, une conclusion vraiment satisfaisante, et avec un peu de chance c’est vers quoi cette saison se dirige. Avec un peu de chance les personnes qui décident nous permettront de faire notre sortie à tous quand le moment sera propice.

Est ce que vous et les autres acteurs êtes vous jamais impliqués dans le développement et les revirements des histoires? Est ce que quelque apport personnel se retrouve dans les scripts ?
A ce stade, je crois qu’on peut dire que les scripts sont comme des plans, et que c’est le travail des acteurs de mettre la couleur entre les lignes comme bon nous semble. Je ne décide pas de ce qui arrive à Michael Scofield, mais à ce stade de la série, personne ne le connaît comme je le connais. Au bout de quatre saisons, c’est mon devoir de sauvegarder l’intégrité du personnage, réplique après réplique et coup après coup. Et les auteurs, et c’est tout en leur honneur, nous permettent d’apporter les changements et les ajustements que nous pensons nécessaires. C’est devenu une véritable collaboration.

Parlons de votre passé. Etant donné votre milieu familial différent, vous sentez-vous américain ou britannique ou quelque chose de complètement différent ?
Je me sens et me suis toujours senti comme un Américain, mais la Grande Bretagne a une place spéciale dans mon cœur. J’ai aussi la double nationalité, ce qui me fait sentir connecté avec la Grande Bretagne de façon très réelle et tangible, même si je n’y suis que né. D’avoir un passeport britannique fait qu’il est aussi plus facile de travailler à l’étranger, et comme le marché international devient de plus en plus important dans le monde du spectacle, et en posséder un peut être très utile.

Est-ce que vos parents ont encouragé votre carrière, ou est ce que ça a été une chose motivée par vos propres objectifs et souhaits ?
Ils m’ont soutenu, mais prudemment. A moins d’être effectivement dans le milieu, il est quelque fois difficile de comprendre ce que c’est que nous faisons, comment fonctionne la vie d’un acteur. Tout ce que mes parents savaient était que pendant des années, je n’avais pas de boulot fixe, ou une source de revenu fixe. Mais ils sont ravis de mon succès. Ils aiment voir ma figure à la télé toutes les semaines. Il faut juste que je prévienne ma maman à l’avance si quelque chose de terrible va arriver à mon personnage. Elle n’aime pas voir Michael qui souffre.

Donc vous atterrissez à Princeton, étudiez la littérature et vous diplômez. Qu’est ce qui se passe après ça ? Comment avez-vous fait la transition entre l’Ivy League (université de prestige, ndt) et Hollywood ?
A l’époque où je me suis diplômé de l’université j’avais pratiquement abandonné mes rêves d’enfant de devenir acteur. Cela semblait trop risqué, trop irréaliste. Mais je voulais quand même faire partie du milieu d’une façon ou d’une autre, alors j’ai trouvé un boulot où je travaillais derrière la caméra pour une compagnie à Los Angeles qui faisait des films pour la télévision. Mais il ne m’a pas fallu longtemps avant que je ne m’avoue à moi-même que ce que je voulais vraiment c’était jouer. Il fallait que je réponde à la question : « et si ? ». alors j’ai commencé à prendre des cours de comédie, et à passer des auditions. Et pour payer le loyer, je travaillais comme stagiaire dans les studios et pour les chaînes de télé, ce qui m’a donné un aperçu incroyable de l’autre coté du milieu. Cela m’a vraiment fait apprécier combien de travail il y a pour monter un film ou une série télé. Cela m’a rendu plus profondément reconnaissant pour tout ce que j’ai accompli.

Comment cela a-t-il été de travailler avec Anthony Hopkins sur The Human Stain ?
Malheureusement, je n’ai pas travaillé effectivement avec Anthony Hopkins parce que je jouais son personnage à un plus jeune age, donc nous n’avons pas eu de scènes ensembles. On a tourné toutes mes scènes d’abord, et ensuite on a donné les prises à Tony pour qu’il les regarde. C’était presque comme s’il avait des films de famille de la jeunesse de son personnage. Et ensuite quand il ont monté tout le film, j’ai remarqué qu’il avait copié un ou deux de mes tics et les a intégré dans son jeu, ce qui était excitant à voir, et incroyablement flatteur.

Vous lancerez-vous à nouveau dans un long métrage ?
Le temps en sera juge. En ce moment je suis très pris par la quatrième saison de la série, mais je commence à penser au futur. Il y a certainement des tas de metteurs en scène avec lesquels j’aimerais travailler, comme Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino et Ang Lee, entre autres. Je dirais probablement « oui » à quelque rôle qu’ils me pourraient me proposer, aussi petit soit-il. De maintes façons, quand Prison Break arrivera à son terme, j’ai l’impression que je devrai recommencer à zéro, me réinventer complètement pour le public. Le re-éduquer quant à qui je suis et ce que je peux faire. Je crois que ce sera beaucoup de travail, mais vraiment nécessaire si je veux abandonner Michael Scofield.

Vous avez fait des apparitions célèbres dans deux vidéos de Mariah Carey à l’époque où Prison Break est arrivé à l’antenne. Comment avez-vous décroché ce job ?
Brett Ratner a mis en scène le Pilote de la série, et quand nous avons terminé m’a recommandé à Mariah Carey pour ses vidéos. Je n’avais jamais tourné de vidéos avant, et il n’y avait aucune garantie que la série allait marcher, donc j’ai dit oui. On a tourné les deux vidéos l’un à la suite de l’autre, et Mariah a été une vrai pro. Elle s’est vraiment donné du mal pour me mettre à l’aise. Et son disque a été un succès et ses deux vidéos ont eu un tas de temps d’antenne, donc quand la série a commencé, plein de gens me connaissaient comme le gars des vidéos de Mariah carey. Et je crois vraiment que ça a aidé à lancer le show.

Avez-vous personnellement des ambitions du point de vue musical? Après tout, vous étiez l’un des Tigertones de Princeton.
Malheureusement, mes jours en temps que chanteur sont derrière moi. Après des années de négligence j’arrive à peine à chanter correctement. Mais j’aimerais faire une comédie musicale ou quelque chose comme ça – du moment qu’il y a suffisamment d’argent dans le budget pour corriger mes chansons au montage.

Qu’aimez-vous faire quand vous ne travaillez pas ?
la plupart de mon temps libre, je le passe en me détendant, en regardant des DVD, en lisant, en faisant des siestes. Mais je ne passe pas tout mon temps sur le divan. Quand nous travaillions à Dallas [sur le tournage de Prison Break], j’ai fait beaucoup de ballades, justes des ballades de la journée dans des petites villes dans tout le Texas. Et je me suis vraiment amusé. Je crois que c’est l’un des meilleurs avantages de la vie d’acteur – le temps de voyager et le temps d’explorer comment les autres personnes vivent leur vie.

Quelque lieu de vacances préféré ?
Mon endroit préféré au Monde est Prospect Park à Brooklyn, New York. C’est juste au bout de la rue où j’ai grandi. C’est le meilleur coin de verdure de la planète et j’essaye d’y retourner à peine j’en ai la possibilité. Assis sur un banc, en train de manger un Jamaican beef patty et regarder les gens passer… y’a rien de mieux. Mais purement pour le spectacle, mi naturel mi fait par la main de l’homme, je crois que Petra en Jordanie est un des endroits les plus stupéfiants sur Terre. Ces façades incroyables sculptées directement dans la pierre rouge. Incroyable. À couper le souffle.

Avez-vous jamais été en Asie? Quelles sont vos impressions et les souvenirs des endroits que vous avez visités?
Je suis allée en Thaïlande et en Corée du Sud, et ce dont je me souviens plus particulièrement c’est la nourriture incroyable que j’ai trouvée dans les deux pays. Et j’ai entendu dire que la nourriture chinoise en Amérique n’a rien à voir avec celle qu’on trouve en Chine, alors j’ai hâte de tester la différence par moi-même. Je me rappelle aussi combien les gens étaient polis et amicaux. J’étais très impressionné parce que je suis un grand fan de l’étiquette et des bonnes manières. C’est tellement important de traiter les gens avec le même degré de respect avec lequel vous voudriez être traité vous-mêmes. C’est pourquoi j’essaye de me comporter au mieux quand je suis à l’étranger, en particulier en Asie. Il n’y a rien de pire que d’être perçu comme le stéréotype du « sale Américain ».

En paraphrasant un vieux dicton : “vous êtes ce que vous mangez”, il y en a un nouveau : « vous êtes ce que vous conduisez ». Que conduisez vous, et comment cela affecte-t-il votre personnalité ?
Je crois que c’est une affirmation potentiellement dangereuse. C’est la raison pour laquelle tellement de gens conduisent des grosses voitures, des voitures extravagantes qu’ils ne peuvent pas trop se permettre, vivant au dessus de leur moyens, et se retrouvant dans des situations difficiles. Mon père a toujours dit u’une voiture servait à vous transporter du point A au point B, et c’est pratiquement ma théorie aussi. Donc je ne conduis pas quelque chose d’outrageusement cher. Ceci dit, je conduis une voiture hybride parce que je crois qu’il est important d’être conscients par rapport à notre environnement. Donc j’imagine que c’est une déclaration en soi.

Etant donné le sujet de vos études, je dois vous demander ce que vous avez lu dernièrement?
malheureusement, je passe la plupart de mon temps libre à lire des scripts. Mais j’ai cette petite pile de livres qui attend que je les prenne en main. J’ai The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay par Michael Chabon, The Devil in the White City par Erik Larson et Darkly Dreaming Dexter par Jeff Lindsay, que j’ai choisi parce que j’ai tellement aimé la série télé sur Dexter. J’espère avoir le temps de m’y mettre un de ces jours. C’est juste une question de « quand ».

Vous avez l’air d’être plutôt en dessous des radars des paparazzis, et je suis sur que vous voulez que les choses restent ainsi. Mais ça fait que les fans meurent d’envie d’en savoir plus sur vos sorties. On vous a cité disant que vous ne sortiez pas beaucoup parce que vous travaillez tout le temps. Mais allez – donnez nous le vrai scoop.
Ha, ha . . . Non.

:merci

FallingStar
Despérément WEM-III

Féminin
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par nidith le Mar 25 Nov 2008 - 20:38

super Toujours très intéressant!

Petra, en Jordanie? confused je ne connais pas! je vais aller m'instruire! dinguotte

Merci! kiss
avatar
nidith
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 41
Localisation : BdR - France
Date d'inscription : 07/01/2008

http://needyou.kazeo.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par ladiuvernuà le Mer 26 Nov 2008 - 0:40

ben quoi ????
jamais vu Indiana Jones et la Dernière Croisade???




et ceci n'est qu'un infime partie... le site est immense....

p.s.: je confirme, c'est merveilleux!
c'était un des endroits que je révais de voir depuis toujours, et j'y suis allée il y a deux ans...

(fin du quart d'heure Kurrrturel)

_________________
--- don't be ---
L-III-V @ http://lwem3v.wordpress.com/
_________________
avatar
ladiuvernuà
Admin'Gurl

Féminin
Localisation : Florence...Italie
Date d'inscription : 16/03/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par nidith le Mer 26 Nov 2008 - 1:54

super c'est superbe! Je suis allée voir des photos sur le net, et... effectivement, j'ai vu tous les Indiana Jones, mais je me souviens + d'Harrison que des lieux où il balade son beau chapeau! :arf

Pis moi, j'ai plus envie d'aller au Kenya... sigh


Spoiler:


Oui, je sais.... stop the flood... fouet
Merci pour la photo! Wink
avatar
nidith
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 41
Localisation : BdR - France
Date d'inscription : 07/01/2008

http://needyou.kazeo.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par bibouille le Mer 26 Nov 2008 - 2:10

tout d'abord merci à toi anne pour cette traduction!!! super super super
et quel plaisir de lire cette it de went!!
on en redemande!


kiss
avatar
bibouille
Psych'Ward VIP

Féminin
Age : 48
Localisation : bourgogne
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Prestige Mag (Novembre 2008)

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 1 sur 2 1, 2  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum